Author

Clare

Browsing

made in Africa

Looking good is big business everywhere, however the politics of African hair winds up as much as the curls do. The reality is whether African hair is political, an identity statement or just a feel good look good vibe – this hair industry is worth billions.

Share

Fomi

Initially the prospect of developing a handbag line in Africa seemed daunting, but that became Afomia Tesfaye’s motivation in creating FOMI. In early 2011, she made the decision to leave Los Angeles to travel back to her native homeland of Ethiopia with the intention of designing a collection of accessories. After researching the country’s indigenous resources, she discovered a little known fact, that Ethiopia produces some of the world’s finest quality leather. Undeterred by the fact that she had no formal design training, she soon completed a collection of colorful yet sophisticated leather handbags.

Share

mobius motors

THE PROBLEM

The majority of roads in rural and peri-urban areas of sub-saharan Africa are degraded. Roads are often cracked and riddled with potholes. Rural roads in particular are invariably uneven, sandy/rocky tracks; making transportation difficult and ultimately restricting mobility.

The most common vehicles across regions like East Africa are imported from more developed countries such as Japan, UAE and India. These vehicles are designed for areas with good road infrastructure – they are not built for an African environment. High import duties also make these vehicles relatively expensive.

Beyond high purchase prices, running a car in countries like Kenya is also expensive. High maintenance costs as a result of bad roads and inappropriate vehicles have continued to push the cost of owning a car up, locking out entry-level buyers, particularly entrepreneurs who require cost-effective vehicles in order to successfully operate their businesses.

solution – cars tailored for Africa by Africa.

Share

OLIBERTE

Oliberté is a sustainable brand supporting workers’ rights in sub-Saharan Africa. They believe in empowerment, transparency, and doing right by all. This means making premium quality products with a lifetime warranty, and it means treating every employee, everywhere in the world, with respect.

Share

Maxhosa by Laduma

“MAXHOSA BY LADUMA knitwear started in 2010 with Laduma Ngxokolo’s desire to explore knitwear design solutions that would be suitable for amakrwala (Xhosa initiates). His vision was to create a modern Xhosa-inspired knitwear collection that would be suitable for amakrwala, who are prescribed by tradition to dress up in new dignified formal clothing for six months after their manhood initiation. As a person who has undergone the process, Laduma felt that he had to develop premium knitwear that celebrates traditional Xhosa aesthetics. Along his journey into exploring astonishing traditional Xhosa beadwork patterns, symbolism and colours, he discovered that they would be the best source of inspiration for the knitwear, which he then reinterpreted into modern knitwear.”

Share

Craftsmanship, Culture and History

Style is a mentality, influenced by fashion, but it comes from within”, according to ONYCHEK’s blog. “All that matters is that it feels right to you. If it gives you that extra boost of personal confidence… That’s style”. Fascinated by the story of one young entrepreneur’s quest to bring African fashion to the world, we decided to find out more. by africanista

Share

West Africa Design Inspiration Secrets

Whether you’re welcoming guests for the first time or coming home after a long day at work, a great hallway should be a gateway, separating the stresses of the outside world from the haven that is your home. So even it is a non-living space, don’t be tempted to relegate it to a dumping ground.

The secret of a great hallway is to make a statement, whilst keeping it simple and clean! Therefore great storage in hallways is the key. I have a beautiful vintage ‘Black Forest’ chest in my hallway, which houses all our everyday shoes (it is lined with rose scented lining paper, so it also acts as a source of scent). I display my West-African statues and have (always )fresh flowers in Merino or mid century glass vases underneath my hexagonal Art Deco mirror, which fits my 1930s house perfectly. This is just a glimpse, but it gives any visitor an idea of what is to come.  Article By Eva Sonaike

Share

What is Luxury in Africa

Travel blogger Ana Silva O’Reilly is an avid traveller, who religiously follows her mother’s mottos:

‘If you leave home, it has to be better’, or ‘I love camping, in 5 star hotels’.

Among the surprises Africa brought her were how beautiful it was – and how well luxury was actually delivered. She also mentioned the quality of the food

“I was surprised by the food in South Africa, and weirdly enough in some cases, how similar it was to Portuguese (my home country). That made me love it even more.”

I know people are impressed by the food on safari, particularly the meals conjured up well away from a modern kitchen.

Whether it is a bush breakfast cooked over a fire, a high tea mid-afternoon, or a restaurant quality supper cooked up in a bush kitchen with no mod-cons. Luxury camps and lodges certainly match Ana’s mother’s motto that ‘it has to be better’.

article by Richard Smith

Share